Broken and abandoned: 1 train, 1 shop and 1 ?

Abandoned is perhaps a closer description of the photos below but broken also fits.

railway museum, Canada

rail car waiting for a facelift – Canada

This impressive car is part of an outdoor railway museum that we visited recently. Our toddler loved it and so did we. Choo choo!

Japan shop, abandoned

Western Japan (exact location to come! Hubby is away and I can’t remember the name of the community.)

Anything old, abandoned and disintegrating is high up on my list of all things interesting, especially when it comes to Japan. Any guesses what this used to be?

river view, Thailand

near the confluence of the Mekong and Mun rivers, Thailand

Here is another mystery object that has seen better days. A shelter? A drying rack? What do you think it might be?

Do you prefer new or old?

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15 thoughts on “Broken and abandoned: 1 train, 1 shop and 1 ?

    • Ya! I was thinking that, too. It was so odd… this sort of shack thing without walls but with a roof in the middle of this dry, cracking earth near two massive rivers. I’m not sure how much the area floods during monsoon but this would likely we covered up. I wonder if it’s related to fishing or swimming? Perhaps it’s underwater part of the year and you could jump off it? Or tie a boat to it?
      Yes! This area was fantastic for photos. It took us so long to get there and then we had trouble getting away after the bus stopped running. We ended up hitchhiking out (all five of us) to the nearest large city!

      • Wow hitch hiking with 5 people, did you manage to get a ride together??
        Yah maybe related to fishing. Maybe they dry the fish in top??

        • Yup! It was a biiiig car. Often times when we hitched from the village, we jumped in the back of a pickup. In fact, we rode in the back of a pickup from Buriram to Bangkok. Over four hours. Nuts!!! I still can’t believe we did that.
          Yes! That’s a good suggestion. I wish I had more pics from other angles.

    • Absolutely! Japan is so much a place of contrast. Whether it’s my 80+ year old ikebana sensei in traditional kimono singing on a portable karaoke machine or a tiny shrine tucked between two new office buildings or, the old and new are so often mashed together in such delightful ways.

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