“On the way” in Japan, Thailand and suburban Canada

This week’s photo challenge is “on the way”. I swooned when I saw Michelle W’s photo to kick off the challenge. It is taken from the air before landing in Amsterdam with the tulip fields in full view. Incredible! I highly recommend WP Weekly Photo Challenge – on the way.

My favorite mode of transport is my own two feet so the photos are from that perspective. The recent ones are from our current neighborhood in Canada with a few from Japan and Thailand from the past.

On the way to the park – a suburban neighborhood in Canada

Canadian neighborhood

a glimpse of suburbia, Alberta

A public holiday was coming up, hence the Canadian flag. You can hire a service that will put a flag on your lawn for a short period before and after public holidays.

crosswalk sign, Canada

crosswalk sign, Alberta

This sign for a crosswalk is near the local elementary school where the park of dreams (for my child) is located. These signs are usually located near schools but can also be anywhere there is an official crosswalk. The crosswalk itself is only two white lines on the road.

This sign has been here as long as I can remember. I wonder if it has ever been replaced. There is a bit of rust seeping behind and down the pole and the decal over the metal plate has puckered.

The image always cracks me up. Are they carrying purses or briefcases? Is the female character being mugged by the male character or is the male character shoving the female character across the road? Or is the male character perhaps an older brother holding the female character back from crossing too soon?

I imagine it’s not easy to create a road sign that will hopefully be correctly interpreted. On the other hand, these signs are interesting. They can sometimes reflect norms and values of the time, even if those ideas are not necessarily relevant anymore. If I remember, I’ll take a photo of the gender neutral washroom sign at the campus where our child has music lessons. That’s a great example of signs evolving with the times.

From the train – Buriram to Ubon Ratchathani, NE Thailand

view from the train, Thailand

lunch!

My experiences travelling by train in Thailand have included long delays, welcome breezes from open windows, hypnotic scenery, and fantastic people watching in 3rd class. Of course, the hard wooden benches, sometimes cramped cars and standing for hours wasn’t always comfortable but getting there was part of the joy.

This photo was taken on our multi-day and somewhat ridiculous journey from the little village near Buriram where we were volunteering to the border with Laos to see the confluence of the Mun and Mekong Rivers.

Kobe wandering and an old shop sign in Kyoto

birdies having a meeting, Port of Kobe, Japan

having a swim, Port of Kobe, Japan

Kobe is one of my favorite cities in Japan. It has a great vibe that I can only describe as a great, big smile.

Hitoshi and I have twice walked from the train station to the port. Last year, these cute, little red-headed (like me!) birds were having a float along the docks.

Zoo-chan, Japan

How are you today? It’s a little chilly, ne?

I adore my drugstore friends. They are everywhere in Japan from tiny rural communities to the middle of Tokyo. Elephants (from a pharmaceutical company) and frogs are the main ones. Someday I’ll do a post of my collection.

liquor shop sign, Kyoto, Japan

Sake and beer are here! Kyoto, Japan

Hitoshi thinks these signs are around 100 years old at least. Both of them read from right to left. The one on the right says Asahi Beer and the one on the left says the name of the store, although it’s hard to make out.

Anything falling down, crooked or still fighting against gravity is a treat for me. If you ever go to Japan, I recommend looking up and around building structures for old signs, lanterns, light fixtures, wiring, flag poles, shutters, figurines, tiles, and remnants of plaster and paint. It’s incredible what you can find!

This photo was taken on the way back from a shrine near our apartment hotel in Kyoto last year.

Somewhere over China

My first camera was a Kodak 110. When I turned 18, my father gave me a Pentax point-and-shoot with some neat features that I never figured out how to use. (I was too impatient.)

I can’t remember when disposable cameras came on the scene. While they had limitations, they were excellent for taking photos outside and I found them really handy.

The last photo I took with a disposable camera was likely the one below, about ten years ago. I took it flying back from China to Canada after my first visit to Thailand. It’s one of my favorite journey pictures.

flying over China

over China

Do you prefer the journey or the destination?

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20 thoughts on ““On the way” in Japan, Thailand and suburban Canada

    • Agreed! There is so much waiting involved. Even though it seems quicker, sometimes it isn’t or it is, but not by much! And as for “this exact moment”, I take it that you are/were in transit? ;D

      • I missed my flight the day I replied to this comment 😀 I was going to the UK for a wedding. This was the worst day of my life. 100% my fault, forgot my ID AND my flight tickets…………..

        • Oh no! Your mind must have been at the wedding before you were. 😀 I imagine everything got worked out though? This reminds me of when I was flying to Toronto for a wedding. Thankfully I was going the day before or I would have missed it! My flight was cancelled and I had to go to the competitors to find a new one. Luckily I wasn’t too delayed but I still had to pay for a new flight. This wasn’t too bad though… my first flight was pretty cheap! A new airline had a promotion for $1 flights and that’s what I was on so buying a new one for one way wasn’t too bad.

          • I think it’s quite horrible when flights are cancelled, because it can change all your plans !! I’m glad to hear that you didn’t lose too much money of this cancelled flight 🙂

            Everything worked out at the end, but it was still a lot of lost time 🙂

  1. The first one and the last one are by far my favorites! I love the first one because of that cool colored fire hydrant [a bit of yellow and blue to make it different.] The last one looks so magical with the mountains and the clouds and the light from the sun.

        • It is awesome! There is the regular train system that runs a loop around the entire island and a high-speed train [HSR] from north to south. Whenever I go to Taipei, I can get there in 45 minutes on the HSR.

          • That’s fantastic! Are the trains reasonably priced too? I would love to have more train travel options in Alberta and western Canada but I know there are simply not enough users to make it viable. There is *still* talk of building a high speed train between Edmonton and Calgary but I doubt that will ever happen. It would be nice but the population of the province and those two cities would have to expand dramatically to make it worth it.

    • Thanks, Constance! I love that fire hydrant too. I can’t recall when they were painted that way. I don’t remember them being like that growing up. There are some communities we’ve been to in Alberta that have crazy decorated ones. They are so much fun! Hands down my favorite is Torrington. Their claim to fame is a gopher museum and every fire hydrant in town is painted like one of the gophers in the museum. Are there any fancy hydrants around where you are??

        • Ha ha! That’s cute. Ever since talking about fire hydrants, I’ve been keeping an eye out for them. So far, I’ve only seen the blue and yellow ones in our area but we’re heading out of town in a couple of weeks and I’ll keep my eyes peeled for variations.

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